GetOffYourGas
Posts: 1139
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 5:25 pm
Location: Syracuse, NY

Re: DCQC charging rates

Tue Apr 23, 2019 6:50 pm

Interesting. Was your battery cold? That unit *should* be able to push at least 100A IIRC.
~Brian

EV Fleet:
2011 Torqeedo Travel 1003 electric outboard on a 22' sailboat
2012 Leaf SV (traded for Bolt)
2015 C-Max Energi (302A package)
2017 Bolt Premier

JeffN
Posts: 132
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:32 am

Re: DCQC charging rates

Sat May 04, 2019 6:05 pm

NeilBlanchard wrote:I used an EVgo unit (eastbound on Mass Pike, near Exit 13) and only got around 22kW, which is pretty disappointing.


Very likely due to a cold battery. And remember, the battery temperature changes slowly so it might be 45F outside when you charge but the pack itself may be colder from spending the night at 30F or whatever.

In any case, if you look at the graph in my article about cold weather charging you will see that the Bolt can be limited to only around 60A at 8-10C or 45-50F which implies around 22 kW.

https://electricrevs.com/2018/10/23/fri ... -coupling/

NeilBlanchard
Posts: 327
Joined: Tue May 31, 2016 4:58 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Re: DCQC charging rates

Tue May 14, 2019 8:35 pm

JeffN wrote:
NeilBlanchard wrote:I used an EVgo unit (eastbound on Mass Pike, near Exit 13) and only got around 22kW, which is pretty disappointing.


Very likely due to a cold battery. And remember, the battery temperature changes slowly so it might be 45F outside when you charge but the pack itself may be colder from spending the night at 30F or whatever.

In any case, if you look at the graph in my article about cold weather charging you will see that the Bolt can be limited to only around 60A at 8-10C or 45-50F which implies around 22 kW.

https://electricrevs.com/2018/10/23/fri ... -coupling/


I had driven it about 15 miles, so that doesn't seem likely. I think the EVgo unit in question was less than 50kW.

JeffN
Posts: 132
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:32 am

Re: DCQC charging rates

Wed May 15, 2019 1:03 pm

NeilBlanchard wrote:
JeffN wrote:
NeilBlanchard wrote:I used an EVgo unit (eastbound on Mass Pike, near Exit 13) and only got around 22kW, which is pretty disappointing.


Very likely due to a cold battery. And remember, the battery temperature changes slowly so it might be 45F outside when you charge but the pack itself may be colder from spending the night at 30F or whatever.

In any case, if you look at the graph in my article about cold weather charging you will see that the Bolt can be limited to only around 60A at 8-10C or 45-50F which implies around 22 kW.

https://electricrevs.com/2018/10/23/fri ... -coupling/


I had driven it about 15 miles, so that doesn't seem likely. I think the EVgo unit in question was less than 50kW.

Driving for only 15 minutes will have very little effect on the battery pack temperature, as noted in the article. You would have to drive at faster highway speeds like 70-75 mph (20+ kW output) for over an hour to really have much useful battery warming. It would help if the Bolt was able to share heat from the motor and and motor inverter into the battery like Tesla and the new Kia/Hyundai car’s can but the Bolt is unable to do that.

The Bolt also doesn’t have any “Winter Mode” to enable the driver to tell the battery heater to turn on before you arrive at a charging station. Tesla recently added that and the Kia/Hyundai models with a dedicated battery heater have a such a mode. There is a link to that in the article.

The only way to know your pack temperature for sure is to get an OBD II reader and the Bolt PID configuration file for your OBD reader app.

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