JeffN
Posts: 123
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:32 am

Re: EVgo DC chargers were horrible up until the beginning of 2018. They're still not perfect, but improvement is being m

Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:59 pm

rcedwards wrote:The Chevy Bolt allows for 150 amps of DC. The EVgo screen reported 110 amps maximum at 40% SOC. I'm not sure if this was a limitation of the charger, or if it was limited because there was a BMW I3 using DCFC on the adjacent charger.

My guess is that 110A was due to cooler winter temperatures.

For details see my article at:

Frigidity and the challenge of high-power coupling
https://electricrevs.com/2018/10/23/fri ... -coupling/

JeffN
Posts: 123
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:32 am

Re: EVgo DC chargers were horrible up until the beginning of 2018. They're still not perfect, but improvement is being m

Mon Jan 14, 2019 7:07 pm

keijidosha wrote:Baker, Ca site now showing all 6 chargers active;

"Dec 13, 2018
Astrid and Niska are original 50kWh.
Chance and Ollie are new 100kWh.
Ivo and Janus are new 350kWh.
All are same $0.20/min but I expect that to change in future with 2019 cars that can actually take advantage of those ultrafast charging rates."

https://www.plugshare.com/location/157532

Slight update:

Change and Ollie are 150 kW
Ivo is 175 kW and Janus is 350 kW

SparkE
Moderator
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Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2016 5:53 am
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: EVgo DC chargers were horrible up until the beginning of 2018. They're still not perfect, but improvement is being m

Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:41 pm

And "kW" is very deceiving - what is really important is Amps.

Rating a DCFC charger as "120 kW" because it can provide 100A at 1200V really doesn't indicate how useful it is. A Bolt (and most EVs) would pull a max of about ... 100A out of it, around 33-38 kW.

A Charger rated at "50 kW" because it can provide up to 125A at 400V is much more useful to almost every EV driver.

A Charger rated at "100 kW" because it can provide up to 200A at 500V is super useful to almost every EV driver - it could pretty much provide more than the max charging rate of almost every (non-Tesla) EV on the road today ... yet it is "only" 100 kW.

The "150 kW" DCFCs that we are seeing start to pop up in the US are "somewhere around" 150-200A, "up to 900-1000V", with a max delivery of 150 kW. In other words, able to provide max charge (in Amps) to CCS and CHAdeMO -equiped EVs driving around the US today.

GetOffYourGas
Posts: 1106
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 5:25 pm
Location: Syracuse, NY

Re: EVgo DC chargers were horrible up until the beginning of 2018. They're still not perfect, but improvement is being m

Tue Jan 15, 2019 10:12 pm

SparkE wrote:The "150 kW" DCFCs that we are seeing start to pop up in the US are "somewhere around" 150-200A, "up to 900-1000V", with a max delivery of 150 kW. In other words, able to provide max charge (in Amps) to CCS and CHAdeMO -equiped EVs driving around the US today.


Wow, is this true? I had just assumed they were something like 300A at 500V, which would seem far more useful overall than, say, 150A at 1000V.
~Brian

EV Fleet:
2011 Torqeedo Travel 1003 electric outboard on a 22' sailboat
2012 Leaf SV (traded for Bolt)
2015 C-Max Energi (302A package)
2017 Bolt Premier

SparkE
Moderator
Posts: 1019
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2016 5:53 am
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: EVgo DC chargers were horrible up until the beginning of 2018. They're still not perfect, but improvement is being m

Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:53 am

GetOffYourGas wrote:
SparkE wrote:The "150 kW" DCFCs that we are seeing start to pop up in the US are "somewhere around" 150-200A, "up to 900-1000V", with a max delivery of 150 kW. In other words, able to provide max charge (in Amps) to CCS and CHAdeMO -equiped EVs driving around the US today.


Wow, is this true? I had just assumed they were something like 300A at 500V, which would seem far more useful overall than, say, 150A at 1000V.


The "120 kW, 100A at 1200V" was hyperbole (a gross exaggeration) on my part to illustrate the point ("kW" rating often being a joke - actual max amps being a better measure). There are both 100A and 125A "50 kW" DCFCs out there, and they do NOT charge a Bolt at the same speed.

The actual specs depend on the vendor (obviously). For example:

The "150" kW ABB units that EVgo is deploying are "max 350A" and 200-920V (limit of 150 kW). The 350 kW ABB units are "max 400A" at 150-920V. (IMO, ONE 350 kW unit every 100 miles along interstates is sufficient.) {ABB's spec sheet lists "175 kW" DCFCs, while the plaque on the side of the "prototype" units installed by EVgo say "150 kW".)

The 200 kW BTC Power units that Recargo install in Salinas are max 250A @ 1000V, and max 500A @ 500V (or so their spec sheet says). (And their specs for their 100 kW unit list 126A @1000V and 250A@500V.) So, frankly, I'm wondering why ANYBODY is installing multiple 200 kW units in any install, instead of a single one (which costs more per minute) and 1-5 others which are the 100 kW units (unless they are very similar in price, so why not).

GetOffYourGas
Posts: 1106
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 5:25 pm
Location: Syracuse, NY

Re: EVgo DC chargers were horrible up until the beginning of 2018. They're still not perfect, but improvement is being m

Wed Jan 16, 2019 12:15 pm

SparkE wrote:
GetOffYourGas wrote:
SparkE wrote:The "150 kW" DCFCs that we are seeing start to pop up in the US are "somewhere around" 150-200A, "up to 900-1000V", with a max delivery of 150 kW. In other words, able to provide max charge (in Amps) to CCS and CHAdeMO -equiped EVs driving around the US today.


Wow, is this true? I had just assumed they were something like 300A at 500V, which would seem far more useful overall than, say, 150A at 1000V.


The "120 kW, 100A at 1200V" was hyperbole (a gross exaggeration) on my part to illustrate the point ("kW" rating often being a joke - actual max amps being a better measure). There are both 100A and 125A "50 kW" DCFCs out there, and they do NOT charge a Bolt at the same speed.

The actual specs depend on the vendor (obviously). For example:

The "150" kW ABB units that EVgo is deploying are "max 350A" and 200-920V (limit of 150 kW). The 350 kW ABB units are "max 400A" at 150-920V. (IMO, ONE 350 kW unit every 100 miles along interstates is sufficient.) {ABB's spec sheet lists "175 kW" DCFCs, while the plaque on the side of the "prototype" units installed by EVgo say "150 kW".)

The 200 kW BTC Power units that Recargo install in Salinas are max 250A @ 1000V, and max 500A @ 500V (or so their spec sheet says). (And their specs for their 100 kW unit list 126A @1000V and 250A@500V.) So, frankly, I'm wondering why ANYBODY is installing multiple 200 kW units in any install, instead of a single one (which costs more per minute) and 1-5 others which are the 100 kW units (unless they are very similar in price, so why not).


Now you are contradicting yourself. Initially you claimed that "The "150 kW" DCFCs that we are seeing start to pop up in the US are "somewhere around" 150-200A, "up to 900-1000V" ", as I quoted. I understand that your 100A/1200V was hyperbole, that's why I only quoted what I did.

But not you are saying they aren't 150-200A, but rather 250-400A. As you know, that's a huge difference. In fact, that's the crux of your argument - that amperage matters, not wattage.

So which are they?

P.S. I've contacted PlugShare a few times and requested an official way to list the amperage of each charger (with L2 it matters as well). The response said that it was a common request and they are "looking into it". That was months ago. So far, nothing has changed.
~Brian

EV Fleet:
2011 Torqeedo Travel 1003 electric outboard on a 22' sailboat
2012 Leaf SV (traded for Bolt)
2015 C-Max Energi (302A package)
2017 Bolt Premier

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