Newbie. Waiting on my 2020 Bolt EV LT

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rdm431

New member
Joined
Jan 23, 2023
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2
Just an hello. New to the EV world, will be my first EV. Just waiting on my 2020 Bolt EV LT to arrive. Trying to real everything on EV, watching every youtube on owning an EV. Located in the midwest where it gets really cold and really hot. I am retired and drive maybe 3 times a week, short jaunts. Walmart, fast food, grocery store, appointments, that's about it. So I'm thinking that the slow charger which comes with the Bolt will be more than sufficient as my car usually sits in the garage for days at a time. Plus, public charging units are available nearby and seldom occupied because this is after all a combustion engine state. I use to see EV's every once in a while, but I think they all moved west out to CA and AZ. The Bolt I purchased was a one owner and actually leased in CA.

So, what I wanted to ask, or get an idea of is how 120v home charging might affect the electric bill? I mean, is a Bolt EV plugged into the wall outlet like plugging in an electric room heater? Is it that extreme considering draw on electric usage? In my case I could see plugging in the Bolt for 2 - 3 days at a time. I know it will eventually fully charge or reach a set capacity limit, but how hard is this on the electric bill? And, exactly how much does it cost to charge using a public charger? How is it done? Do I need to join charging clubs or services like Electrify America and PlugShare?

I may sound a little paranoid about owning an EV, but actually the experience sounds like a real opportunity. A geeky thing for sure. But I think my case is unique where I seldom drive, and am retired so I don't need to go out on a daily basis, and I'm not in a hurry per se.
To me, owning an EV is like flying a plane. You plan your route, your trip, and make sure you don't run out of fuel in the middle of nowhere or five thousand feet in the air. :D
Thanks!
 
Don't know your electrical rates; they are somewhat higher here in LA.

When I first leased my 2017 Bolt EV, I was retired, had stopped driving Uber and would drive up to see a friend in Santa Cruz once every couple of months.

My electric bill went up about $40 per month.

When I started driving Uber again and full time, driving 800-1,000 miles per week, my electric bill was about $275-300 extra per month

Relax; you will enjoy driving your Bolt!
 
Just an hello. New to the EV world, will be my first EV. Just waiting on my 2020 Bolt EV LT to arrive. Trying to real everything on EV, watching every youtube on owning an EV. Located in the midwest where it gets really cold and really hot. I am retired and drive maybe 3 times a week, short jaunts. Walmart, fast food, grocery store, appointments, that's about it. So I'm thinking that the slow charger which comes with the Bolt will be more than sufficient as my car usually sits in the garage for days at a time. Plus, public charging units are available nearby and seldom occupied because this is after all a combustion engine state. I use to see EV's every once in a while, but I think they all moved west out to CA and AZ. The Bolt I purchased was a one owner and actually leased in CA.

So, what I wanted to ask, or get an idea of is how 120v home charging might affect the electric bill? I mean, is a Bolt EV plugged into the wall outlet like plugging in an electric room heater? Is it that extreme considering draw on electric usage? In my case I could see plugging in the Bolt for 2 - 3 days at a time. I know it will eventually fully charge or reach a set capacity limit, but how hard is this on the electric bill? And, exactly how much does it cost to charge using a public charger? How is it done? Do I need to join charging clubs or services like Electrify America and PlugShare?

I may sound a little paranoid about owning an EV, but actually the experience sounds like a real opportunity. A geeky thing for sure. But I think my case is unique where I seldom drive, and am retired so I don't need to go out on a daily basis, and I'm not in a hurry per se.
To me, owning an EV is like flying a plane. You plan your route, your trip, and make sure you don't run out of fuel in the middle of nowhere or five thousand feet in the air. :D
Thanks!
So, here in TN, we have below average electrical costs. That being said, we charge two Bolts and drive a bunch (young kids involved in everything at pretty good distances) We see virtually no difference in our electrical bill. My estimate is that it costs (approximately) $3.50 to fill each car up with "juice" The real question is, how much are you saving vs buying gas. I have a 2012 Nissan Pathfinder as well, that I use for hauling dogs, stuff, foul weather, etc. It gets 15mph. to go 300 miles I spend $65 (ish) vs $4-$5 on the bolts. So yeah, I thinks its an opportunity, I'm totally sold (just bought these two bolts after leasing one for 3 years and seeing the savings and joy of not going to a station) In the 3 years of a lease my maintenance costs were $19.99 for one tire rotation, literally. I haven't joined any clubs and if I need to travel greater than 200 miles on a trip, I just rent a car for $30 per day (hotwire) and call it a day. I also had a high speed charger installed for $120 + $150 for parts, we tried the 120 volt for 6 months and its just inconvenient. Crazy easy, effectively a dryer outlet in my garage and heavy gauge wire and a high end plug, found an independent contractor who did it for the 1 hour of labor. Finally, check your electric company rates for peak and non-peak rates. You can set your car to only charge to off peak rate times (In my area I save 20% if I charge between the hours of 10PM and 4AM, which on 220 is enough to fully charge the bolts 65KW battery) Needless to say, I'm a convert and won't be going back anytime soon. Good luck, and enjoy.
 
Know your electric rates, and if by chance you have solar, set your car to charge only when your solar output is high.
Also, I have had my car for three years, and have never used a cost based charge station. For some unknown reason, my nearby fire station had a free charger that three or four of us knew about and used. They recently removed it, again reason unknown. Check your area, maybe you will get lucky.
I bought a 220 setup for my garage and did not finish install because it was not needed, but now I may hook out up.
 
Know your electric rates, and if by chance you have solar, set your car to charge only when your solar output is high.
this charging schedule may not be most cost efficient, though it is more electrically efficient; because of different time-of-use rate plan.
 

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